Sweaty Armpits & Underarm Sweating

Sweaty armpits or axillary sweating is one of the most common areas of hyperhidrosis. This condition affects 2-3% of the population often has a significant impact on the emotional, social and professional aspect of patients. Treatments in the past has been disappointing, however under the new PBS entitlement for injectables , axillary hyperhidrosis can be safely and effectively treated. Treatment under a specialist will save patients over $1000 for this treatment.

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Sweaty Hands

Sweaty hands or palmar hyperhidrosis is one of the most common areas of excessive sweating.  Excessively sweaty hands can be seen in 2-3% of the population. Treatments are readily available. The Sweat Free Clinic in Brisbane combines a multidisciplinary approach to sweaty hands. We always recommend simple treatments such as topical antiperspirants as first line management, increasing to creams, iontophoresis, sweat stopping treatments and finally surgery. If you have sweaty hands, our team will find a solution to help you stop sweating.

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Sweaty Feet Treatments

Sweaty feet or plantar hyperhidrosis is a common condition affecting 2-3% of the population. Apart from the uncomfortable nature of this condition, excess sweat in this area can cause a number of medical problems including malodour (smell) as well as infections, eczema and blisters. Basic foot care forms the basis of management. Treatment for excessive sweating in this area is difficult, but possible. Sweat Free consultants emphasise basic treatments such as Driclor, tablets and Iontophoresis as first line treatments, reserving sweat stopping treatments for last line management.

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Facial Sweating, Blushing & Flushing

Facial blushing, flushing, and redness may occur as a stand-alone condition, or maybe associated with excessive facial sweating. Most often the cause is unknown, however some patients have associated conditions. Facial sweating often is a stand-alone condition and most commonly affects the forehead, scalp and upper lip areas. Excessive sweating on the face is very hard to hide, and may cause significant embarrassment to sufferers.

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Everywhere - Generalised Hyperhidrosis

Very rarely patients may present to the Sweat Free Clinic with sweating everywhere. This is called Generalised Hyperhidrosis.  Many cases are unknown, however it is important to exclude secondary causes of hyperhidrosis. Certain medical conditions such as thyroid disease, infections, diabetes and drugs can cause secondary generalised hyperhidrosis. With this pattern of sweating, finding a physician to exclude potential underlying problems is very important.

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Compensatory Sweating

Compensatory hyperhidrosis is a common event that occurs after ETS or endoscopic thoracic symapathectomy. This is a form of rebound sweating that can occur on parts of the body that were not affected from sweating like sweaty palms. This form of excessive sweating can occur on the trunk, underarms, limbs, face, and scalp. Once compensatory hyperhidrosis occurs, it often persists. Effective treatments are possible. The Specialist at Sweat Free Clinic use a combination of creams, tablets and in some cases sweat stopping treatments injections to help reduce the inconvenience of compensatory sweating.

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Groin Sweating Treatments

Excess sweating can occur in any area of the body, and the groin is no exception. Hyperhidrosis of this area can be uncomfortable and often creates chaffing of clothes, which in turn can create skin irritation. Sweating in this area can also create problems in social and sexual relationships. Sweating in this area can be difficult to treat, however simple measures such as avoidance of skin irritants such as harsh soap can help reduce chaffing. Wearing loose clothing can also reduce irritation. The majority of patients who experience excessive sweating in the groin area will benefit from a combination of treatments including compounded anti-sweating creams, topical antiperspirants and in some cases sweat stopping treatments injections.

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